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Course Book

Barclay Hills offers courses in the following subject areas.

English/Language Arts Courses

English 9

1 credit

English 9 focuses on comprehension of contemporary and classical literature. Basic writing skill is improved through class assignments and augmented by I Am Online, an Internet based writing program of self-discovery.

English 10

1 credit

English 10 focuses on theme recognition in works of fiction and non-fiction from contemporary authors. Writing in English 10 focuses on comparing and contrasting various works of literature to one another and connecting literature to students' own lives.

English 11

1 credit

English 11 includes studies in short stories, mythology, and contemporary literature to examine the effect of writing in the modern world. Writing in English 11 focuses on the messages, morals, and impacts of the varied literature read in class with an especially strong focus on persuasive writing.

English 12

1 credit

English 12 focuses on British and American Literature and an in-depth analysis thereof. Writing in English 12 focuses on expressing the analysis of the literature and its context in the time period in which it was written.

Careers Courses

Careers I & II

.5 credit

This two-marking period course focuses on life skills and business ownership. During the first six weeks of class, students will cover, but are not limited to, budgeting, finding an apartment, using a bank and credit cards, writing checks and balancing a checkbook, and learning how to become a wise consumer. Students will also learn how to build their credit and are made aware of identity theft and credit card fraud. In the second six weeks students focus their efforts toward entrepreneurship. Students will study the qualities needed for building their own business, the effects of economy on a business owner, and developing a business plan. The final business plan includes the building of their business in a scale form, developing an advertisement for their business, and learning all costs incurred to establish their own business.

Careers III & IV

.5 credit

This is a combined traditional classroom and online course. In Careers III, students use the WIN for WorkKeys program that certifies their level of knowledge in nine key areas. Students will earn completion certificates in the following areas: Applied Math, Applied Technology, Listening, Locating Information, Observation, Reading for Information, Teamwork, Writing, Business Writing, and Work Habits. These certificates can replace some placement tests at different job sites. Career Clusters and Career Trends are also covered.

In Careers IV, we evaluate student's skills, interests and abilities. Students will complete the Myers-Briggs personality test and learn about careers that are in their interest fields. Students will practice applications, and learn how to present themselves during the application process. We also will develop a cover letter and resume while studying work relationships. Students learn how to use action words, develop and critique r sum s, learn the do's and don'ts of interviewing, and perform mock interviews. The class will also give time for students to research and apply to different colleges and trade schools, and fill out student financial aid paperwork. Students will exit the course with valuable resource information that they will be able to use throughout their life.

Social Studies Courses

Government

.5 credit

This course surveys the concepts of American citizenship. Included are the ideas of responsibility and duty to our country. Students also learn the reasons for government and what unites America. They gain understanding of the foundations of our government and its roots. The Constitution, Bill of Rights, and three branches of government are studied and analyzed. Focus is given to state and local governments as well. Students participate in the election process and learn how world events affect us and our government.

Economics

.5 credit

This course covers the basic economic concepts and the practical aspects of applying them to daily living. It starts by students taking stock of themselves to provide basic instruction of life skills and decision making. Topics include budgeting, handling money, understanding credit, the economy, shopping for food, clothing, entertainment, health and fitness. Students are then walked through the basics of living on their own: housing, transportation, insurance, and investing.

U.S. History Reconstruction - Present

1 credit

This course picks up at the end of the Civil War 1865 and runs to the present time. Themes in the course include Reconstruction, Growth of the West, Industrialization, Immigration, Progressive Era; Becoming a World Power, The Suffrage and Prohibition Movements, World War I, Jazz Age, Great Depression, The New Deal, World War II, The American Dream, Civil Rights, The Women's Movement, Vietnam, Watergate, The Energy Crisis, Globalization, Reagan-economics, Space Exploration, Gulf War, Iraq War and TV. Each decade is intensively studied for students to gain an understanding of how their world has been shaped. All the presidents from Johnson to Obama are analyzed to see the impact of each presidency.

World History

1 credit

This year-long course begins at the dawn of civilization, moves to Mesopotamia and explores the first civilizations, especially great civilizations like Rome and Greece. Eastern history is studied as well - China, Japan, and India. The class continues through the Dark Ages and ends at the Age of Exploration. All of the major religions are studied, as well political systems. Geography is a major component of the course.

Math Courses

Pre Algebra

.5 credit

Students will learn math skills through interaction and practice with their classmates that will help them understand the real world and how to use those skills fluently to solve problems, identify and communicate in their daily environment. This course will prepare students for higher level math courses and build a solid mathematical foundation.

Algebra I

1 credit

This is a functions-based course with an emphasis upon fluency between representations, such as understanding when the target information is best communicated by graphs, tables or equations. Study of real numbers and patterning leads naturally into algebraic modeling as a method of handling real-world applications. Linear and exponential functions play a major role in this course with particular connections to geometry, probability and statistics. All assignments are completed in class; students may work in groups, pairs or individually. There will be significant hands-on experiences and technological support to facilitate varied learning styles.

Geometry

1 credit

This Geometry course will emphasize visual aspects and applications of geometrical constructs. Students will learn to both communicate and interpret concepts and problem-solving. For instance, students will know how to measure, as well as to interpret measurement. Of particular interest are angle geometry, linearity, transformations and symmetries, triangle geometry with trigonometry and logic. This will be an applications-driven course with relevance to volumes, areas and tilings, as well as ratio and distance problems. Class work is the foundation of the course, as students will investigate this material through activities and constructions both individually and in teams.

Algebra II

1 credit

This course both strengthens and extends the fundamentals of a first algebra course. Fluency in both writing and solving equations will be emphasized. The study of functions and function families will include the Quadratic and Polynomial Functions, Exponential and Logarithmic Functions, Rational Functions, as well as Sequences and Series. Technology will be emphasized to facilitate knowledge of multiple representations, in order to present the best solution in context to the real-world problems studied. Connections to geometry and statistics will be of note. Students will investigate in groups and in pairs; class work will provide the majority of the learning experience.

Science Courses

Biology

1 credit

Biology is a science course where students investigate the living world around them, on both macroscopic and microscopic level, using field study and laboratory techniques. Students will study the diversity, complexity and interconnectedness of living systems. Topics covered include cell physiology, organ systems, disease-causing organisms, genetics, evolution, characteristics and classification of life forms, ecology and what impact humans have on the environment and ecosystems of our earth.

Chemistry

1 credit

Chemistry is a science course where students will study and apply the concepts of chemistry. Students will identify properties of common families of elements, how elements differ in structure and electrical charges, the risk/benefit balance of using household and agricultural products, and the development of new products by the breaking of bonds and rearrangement of atoms. Additional topics include quantitative study of the gas laws, mass, and volume
relationships of elements, and acid-base reactions.

Earth Science

1 credit

This year long course is broken down into two 18 week sections. The course is directly aligned with Michigan's Merit standards. We use a variety of approaches to try to understand the physical workings of the Earth. Laboratory assignments and demonstrations will be used to bring clarity to topics discussed throughout the semester. Topics covered but are not limited to: Theories of Earth's development and history, earth's spheres, rock cycle, space, sun, erosion, atmosphere, water processes and natural disasters.

Computer Applications

Computer Applications

1 credit

All students are required to complete the Office 2007 series in Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, and Excel. This is primarily a self-instructional course where students work through a step-by-step textbook given explicit instructions and visual examples. A teacher is available at all times to assist students with the assignments. For each unit, students complete a review test and several projects.

Art Education

Elements of Art

1 credit

This course is made up of six units, each encompassing one of the traditional elements of art - Shape, Line, Value, Form, Texture, and Color. Each lesson will build on the last cumulative, but individual assignments and projects should be modular and enough to accommodate some flexibility.

Plato Online Courses

Language Arts

English I
1.00 credit
Units cover Reading and Writing, The Structure of Language, Language Use and Language History, Researching a Complex Process, Practical Persuasion, Mass Media, Poetry and Short Stories, The Odyssey, Romeo and Juliet, and Studies in the Novel. There is a mid-tern and final exam. Projects are required for each unit.

English II
1.00 credit
Units cover Reading, Writing, and Speaking, Language Structure, Writing Effective Sentences, Exposition, Get a Job, Media and You, Short Stories, Reviewing Literature, Poetry, and Pygmalion. There is a mid-tern and final exam. Projects are required for each unit.

English III
1.00 credit
Units cover The Uses and Varieties of English, Writing Effective Sentences, Sentence Workshop, Why study English?, Poetry, Nonfiction, American Drama, Studies in the American Novel, Research, and Reviewing Communication Skills and Literature. There is a mid-tern and final exam. Projects are required for each unit.

English IV
1.00 credit
Units cover The Worth of Words, The Structure of Language, Reading, Researching, and Listening Skills, Studying Language, Medieval English Literature, Elizabethan Literature, 17th and 18th Century English Literature, Romantic and Victorian Poetry, and Creative Writing. There is a mid-tern and final exam. Projects are required for each unit.

Mathematics

Algebra I
1.00 credit
Units cover Foundations of Algebra, Linear Equations, Functions, Inequalities, Linear Systems, Polynomials, Exponential and Radical Functions, Quadratics, Rational Expressions, and Probability and Statistics. There is a mid-tern and final exam. Projects are required for each unit.

Algebra II
1.00 credit
Units cover Set, Structure, and Function, Numbers, Sentences, and Problems, Linear Equations and Inequalities, Polynomials, Algebraic Fractions, Real Numbers, Quadratic Relations and Systems, Exponential Functions, and Counting Principles. There is a mid-tern and final exam. Projects are required for each unit.

Geometry
1.00 credit
Units cover a basic introduction to Geometric Concepts, Logic, Angles and Parallels, Congruent Triangles and Quadrilaterals, Similar Polygons, Circles, Area and Volume, Coordinate Geometry, and Transformations. There is a mid-tern and final exam. Projects are required for each unit.

Pre-Calculus
1.00 credit
Units cover Relations and Functions, Functions, Trigonometric Functions, Circular Functions and their Graphs, Identities and Functions of Multiple Angles, Application of Trigonometric Functions, Inverse Trigonometric Functions and Polar Coordinates, Quadratic Equations, Probability, and Calculus Review. Projects are required for each unit.

Consumer Math
1.00 credit
Units cover Basic Math Review, Personal Finance, Statistics, Taxes and Insurance, Banking Services and Investments, Banking and Credit Costs, Purchase and Sale of Goods, Leisure, Travel, and Retirement, and Job Related Services. Projects are required for each unit.

Trigonometry
.5 credit
Units cover Right Triangle Trigonometry, Graphing and Inverse Functions, Analytic Trigonometry, Trigonometric Applications, and Polar Coordinates. Projects are required for each unit.

Social Studies

World History
1.00 credit
Units cover The Beginnings of Human Society, Early River Valley Civilizations, Classical Traditions, Major Religions, and Giant Empires, Expanding Zones of Exchange and Encounter, Intensified Hemispheric Interactions, Global Expansion and Encounter, The Age of Revolution, A Half Century of Crisis and Achievement, the 20th Century, and Turning Points in Human History. There is a mid-tern and final exam. Projects are required for each unit.

U.S. History: Foundations to Present
1.00 credit
Units cover Foundations of the American Republic, Development of Constitutional Government, National Expansion, A Nation Divided, A Nation Divided and United, The Search for Peace, A Nation at War, Contemporary America. There is a mid-tern and final exam. Projects are required for each unit.

U.S. History: Reconstruction to Present
1.00 credit
Unites cover Sectionalism and War, Growth and Innovation, America on the World Stage, Ecstasy and Depression, The War Years, Hope, Tragedy and, Conflict, Monumental Changes, Turmoil at Home and Abroad, End of an Era, and Complex Domestic and Foreign Issues. There is a mid-tern and final exam. Projects are required for each unit.

Economics
.5 credit
Units cover Free Enterprise, Banking, Budget and Finance, The Stock Market, Business and You. There is a final exam and projects are required for each unit.

Government
.5 credit
Units cover International Governments, History of Governments, United States Government, The American Party System, The Citizen and His Government. There is a final exam and projects are required for each unit.

Twentieth Century American History
.5 credit
This class begins during the Industrial Era. Units cover Coming of Age, Modern America Emerges, Boom to Bust, World War II and the Cold War, and Change, Continuity, and Conflict. There is a final exam and projects are required for each unit.

Vietnam Era
.5 credit
Units cover The Origins of the U.S. Involvement in Vietnam, From Military Advisors to Combat Troops, A Nation Divided by War, Achieving Peace with Honor, and the Legacy of Vietnam. There is a final exam and projects are required for each unit.

Science

Earth Science
1.00 credit
Units cover the Origin of the Erath, History of the Earth, Dynamic Structure of the Earth, Forces and Features of the Earth, Features of the Earth's Crust, Shaping Earth's Crust, Earth's Water, Earth's Atmosphere, Earth's Weather and Climate, and Astronomy. There is a mid-tern and final exam. Projects are required for each unit.

Biology
1.00 credit
Units cover Biology: The Study of Life, Biochemistry, Cells, Cell Energy, Cell Division and Reproduction, Genetics and Heredity, Microbiology and Biodiversity, Plants, Animals and Humans, and Ecology and the Environment. There is a mid-tern and final exam. Projects are required for each unit.

Chemistry
1.00 credit
Units cover Measurement and Analysis, Starting the investigation: How to Identify Elements, Compounds, and Mixtures, Exploring Laws for Gases and Conservation of Mass, the Discovery of Atoms: Nature's Building Blocks, Molecular Structure, Chemical Reactions, Rates, and Equilibrium, Equilibrium Systems, Carbon Chemistry: Hydrocarbons, and Carbon Chemistry: Functional Groups. There is a mid-tern and final exam. Projects are required for each unit.

Additional Courses

Physical Fitness
.5 credit
Units cover an Overview of Fitness, Activity Logging and Flexibility Training, Cardiovascular Fitness, Resistance Training, and Motivation and Mindset. There are multiple extracurricular projects required for this course. There is a test for each unit. This class fulfills the Michigan Merit Curriculum Physical Education requirement.

High School Health
.5 credit
Units cover Body Essentials, Physical Health, Social and Mental Health, Preventative Health Care and First Aid, and Responsible Living. There are multiple extracurricular projects required for this course. There is a test for each unit. This class fulfills the Michigan Merit Curriculum Health Education requirement.

Music Theory
.5 credit
Units cover Rhythm and Meter, Notation and Pitch, Scales and Key Signatures, Harmony, and Making Music. There are multiple extracurricular projects required for this course. There is a test for each unit. This class fulfills a portion of the Michigan Merit Curriculum Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts requirement.